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Airbnb & Nest Partnership – A Huge Win for Google, Airbnb and Hosts, but is it Good for Guests?

By Scott Kirk We recently discussed Airbnb’s partnership with Nest (acquired by Google in January 2014 for $3.2B). The nuts and bolts of the partnership include Airbnb providing selected hosts with the Nest Learning Thermostat free of charge ($250 retail value) and access to Nest’s MyEnergy platform that allows hosts to track energy consumption, learn […]

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I Have Hope: How Technology Will Help Solve Our Global Energy & Environmental Challenges

By Anonymous Summary: A look at three companies that are commercializing technologies that profitably eliminate waste streams and generate clean electricity, fuels, and chemicals. Discussion in a well-educated classroom of business and policy students can quickly grow discouraging as we talk about the failure of policy, rising global emissions, the coal build-out in China, and […]

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The Threat and Mitigation of Regulatory Risk – Revisiting EnerNOC

By Ben B. Despite the lower costs of power generation due to decreased natural gas prices – a theme we have discussed many times in the course – EnerNOC seemingly navigated 2013 successfully, with a positive operating profit for the first time since 2010. By the time the company announced its 2013 financial performance, EnerNOC’s […]

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Using the Latest Technology to Improve Sustainability

By Dave U. The final discussion question of the Nestle case asks: “What is the best way for Nestle to use the latest technology in improving the management of human, land, and water resources across its operations and supply chain?” I thought it might be interesting to explore what other similar food and beverage giants […]

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How to Pay for the Electric Grid

By Michael Rubenstein This post explores how electric grids are paid for and what the effects of a transition from polluting, extractive energy sources (such as coal, natural gas and uranium) to clean, renewable energy sources (such as wind and solar) would have on how such payments are determined. Currently, electric grids are typically paid […]

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Changing Consumer Behavior

By Jair H. Many of the topics that we’ve covered are solutions to the underlying problem at stake. Consumers will not change consumption behavior easily, or at all. EnerNOC tackles this challenge by offering a monetary reward to consumers who are willing to diminish their consumption at a specific time. EnerNOC’s solution is actually saving […]

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The Future of Solar Cell Manufacturing: Consolidation Towards Efficiency

By: Anonymous As we have seen with 1366 Technologies, efficiency in solar cell manufacturing is providing cheaper equipment costs and beginning energy jobs back to the United States, which may be crucially important in a largely “jobless” recovery to the Great Recession. In the solar supply chain, the author of this post will argue, the […]

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Demand for DemandSMART?

By Carl H. A couple weeks ago as a group, we discussed the future of EnerNOC’s DemandSMART product. But we didn’t dig deep on who exactly pays for these “negawatts” and why they find this product attractive. Doing so is quite an illuminating exercise; it helps us predict the future trajectory for the (ahem) demand […]

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EnerNoc: The business risk of fixing a regulatory failure

By Seth H. In 2001, EnerNoc created a unique business model of selling so-called “demand response,” in which it would pay companies to lower their electricity consumption during periods of peak demand and sell such reduction to the electric utilities, in the form of so-called “nega-watts.” Such a business is without doubt a public good. […]

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Behavioral change in residential electricity consumption

By Franziska E. The effectiveness-cost pyramid suggests that the biggest potential for energy savings lies in behavioral change. How can we realize this potential for savings by changing the behavior of the demand side? The first lever that comes to my mind is influencing consumption by increasing the price. As we already discussed in the […]

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