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Better Foods = More Water-Intensive Foods?

By Dave Uppal In our class on Whole Foods, we discussed the importance of moving our population toward a healthier diet. Students talked about how they felt better when they ate food they bought at Whole Foods and how we could solve a lot of public health crises by eating better. I decided to look […]

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Business Model for Home-scale water and waste water re-use in Kenya

By Edwin My previous blog (see “what business model for home-scale water and waste water re-use in Kenya.”) looked into establishing a business model for home-scale water and waste water re-use in Kenya. At the conclusion of the blog, four possible routes that one could take in establishing a business model are listed. I chose […]

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The Central Valley: Does It Need Bigger Farms?

By Gideon To some extent, the Woolf Farming case and the story of the Woolf family call to mind a romantic image of the family famer in America. But the tragedy the case discusses – the California drought and its impact on the many family businesses in the area – may actually reinforce the case […]

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Dealing with Dilemma: Reconciling Water Tensions between Farmers and Families in CA

By Wyatt Smith In “Woolf Farming and Processing”, our class confronted the vexing challenges of water distribution and shortage, attempting to reconcile the tensions between usage, rights, and payment that define water shortage issues. Digging deeper into the market failures complicating these issues, it becomes clear that solutions are not easy: Accounting for 80% of […]

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Success Factors of Sound Group

By Dafu The Chinese name of Sound sounds very much similar to the now insolvent solar panel producer Suntech Power Holdings Co. Ltd. Both of these corporations were funded by renowned academics in their respective fields. The critical success factor for Sound Group, in my opinion, lies in three areas: First of all, the success […]

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The Case for Hydro Power

By WW The Colbrun hydroelectric project in Chile illustrates the regulatory and political constraints on hydro power that operate in most OECD countries. It is perhaps ironic that one of the oldest, cleanest, cheapest and most reliable forms of renewable energy-water power-draws such environmental opposition and so little development interest. The problem, of course, stems […]

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What is the value of an endangered species?

By Bret As we have seen in multiple classes thus far, the interests of business and profit often impose on the viability of an endangered species. In California, central valley farmers supporting cash crops with water transported from the north threatened the finger-sized Delta smelt through pumping activity and heightened water salinity. In the Mojave […]

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Texas Water Supply and Demand Dynamics

By Ashleigh The state of Texas is the second largest in the U.S. and is slightly larger than France, with an economy larger than that of Spain. For a state of this size, proper water supply management is a complex task despite the comparatively well-developed infrastructure and high per capita income, which contrast to areas […]

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Mexico City water shortage: a case for private sector role in correcting a government imperfection

By Anonymous In the class discussion on the Mexico City water shortage, we discussed the dire water supply situation primarily from the perspective of Carranza Property Fund (CPF), assessing whether to long, short, or hold its investments into the District Federal (DF) commercial real estate. However, one lense on this situation has been overlooked – […]

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Mexico City Water Shortage: Changing Consumer Behavior to Effect Change

By Kayley In the Mexico City Water Shortage case, we saw that despite plentiful rainwater, Mexico City still suffered from severe shortages of clean water with persistent theft, leakage, and non-payment despite efforts from a public-private partnership (“PPP”). While in class we focused on various structural challenges that impeded progress – namely dispersed responsibility across […]

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