Tag Archives: California

Brightsource: A Lesson for Regulatory Reform in our Permitting Process

By: Anonymous With the BrightSource case, our class was able to see a confluence of federal government incentives – from preferential land development to tax equity capital expenditure subsidies – at work. Our 80 minutes discussing the case highlighted the frustrations of any developer in the process of putting together a project, but especially so […]

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‘Smart from the Start’ – Choosing the Right Renewable Sites

By Blake In the Brightsource case, we discussed the construction of the Ivanpah solar-thermal power plant in the Mojave Desert. Brightsource faced a number of technical and economic challenges in launching the facility, but one of the most significant hurdles faced was actually from environmentalists over the impact to the desert tortoises living on the […]

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What is the value of an endangered species?

By Bret As we have seen in multiple classes thus far, the interests of business and profit often impose on the viability of an endangered species. In California, central valley farmers supporting cash crops with water transported from the north threatened the finger-sized Delta smelt through pumping activity and heightened water salinity. In the Mojave […]

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Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink

Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink By “Henry Barton” Desperate times require desperate measures. According to the US Drought Monitor, ~82% of California is currently in a state of extreme drought, leading to Central Valley farmers like Jim Woolf having to collectively abandon 450,000 acres of farmland to the desert. This dire state […]

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California: H2 Uh, Oh…

By Eleanor B. For the third consecutive year, California is experiencing a drought of historic levels, causing water shortages to supply residential communities and hardship for agriculture and other industries that rely on water to produce goods. Despite statewide conservation efforts employed throughout 2014, the impact of recently implemented water efficiency programs have barely changed […]

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A better assessment of business sustainability and an exit strategy are needed for agribusinesses, especially in heavily geo-engineered areas.

By Rita Chung Looking at the case of the effects of drought on agriculture in the Central Valley of California, I tried to figure out whether there were any other solutions to water scarcity besides artificially reshaping the land once again with the Peripheral Canal project. Fundamentally, agribusiness in Central Valley got into this quagmire […]

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Utilities: A public right or private property?

By Clare The case on Californian water raised a question that has been answered differently in regions across the world. How should utilities be divided between the people and land in a given region? If we take environmental issues out of the problem, the Californian water problem boils down to the North having the greater […]

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Water – damned if you do, damned if you don’t

By S.K. The discussion around Woolf Farms is deeply troubling. As a native Californian (let alone someone from water guzzling Orange County), I am proud of our diverse economy, and proud that we are the fruit and nut basket to America. We have at our disposable a portion of the best land in The San […]

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Achieving Sustainable Water Use Through Appropriate Pricing

By Anonymous In keeping with the habit of consuming on borrowed funds, parts of America are waking up to water shortages after using more than was truly available. This overconsumption beyond the replacement rate must be discouraged with appropriate pricing to ensure long-term sustainable resource use. With only 2.5 percent of the world’s water being […]

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Solar in the Valley

By Edward K. In class we discussed the challenges facing the farmers of California’s Central Valley due to water shortages. One of the ‘alternative’ solutions brought up in class was for farmers to either sell or lease out arid farmland to developers of greenfield solar farms. There are three factors that make this a feasible […]

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