Tag Archives: hydraulic fracking

Most Commented through November 26

By John Macomber These posts have received the most comments through the second submission for groups A and B.   New comments may want to build on these. As you think about last posts and comments, here are some popular tags that have spanned several posts, also generating a lot of interest (although not concentrating comments […]

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Response to: US Shift to Natural Gas – Effects on EU Coal Consumption

By Amy (Note: This is a response to another post here. It’s entered as a new post in order to maintain the graphics – John) Samantha brought up some very interesting points. It is fascinating that a developed country like Germany, who has been the role model for clean energy, is now building coal-fired power […]

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Texas Water Supply and Demand Dynamics

By Ashleigh The state of Texas is the second largest in the U.S. and is slightly larger than France, with an economy larger than that of Spain. For a state of this size, proper water supply management is a complex task despite the comparatively well-developed infrastructure and high per capita income, which contrast to areas […]

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The Future of the Monterey Shale: Invest or Divest?

By Mohammed With the recent Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) downward revision of the Monterey Shale reserves from 2011 estimates of 15.42 billion to 600 million (only 4% of the 2011 estimates) barrels of recoverable oil and California’s constant oil production decline since 1985, is the oil and gas industry in the nation’s third largest oil […]

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Fracking Policy When Left to the States

By Sun-Young C. As seen with several cases (Mexico City’s water shortage, California’s agriculture, and even various power markets), a move towards government involvement and a more coordinated form of regulation most often results in more efficient allocation and delivery of scarce resources through improved incentives for the parties involved. A case in which government […]

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Frack Yes or No? The 4 Greatest Public Risks of Fracking Compared to Conventional Gas

By Jeremy D. Politics isn’t the only divisive game in town. A 2013 Pew Poll shows Americans are split on their energy too – with 49% opposed to fracking and 44% in favor. But is the visceral anti-fracking public stigma rooted in valid concerns? I’ll briefly explore the four largest fracking risks and how they […]

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Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy: Lifecycle Emissions

By Tyler Ellis Much has written about the importance of transitioning to a low-carbon economy and what the new electricity mix should be according to the particular author’s preferences. However, not much has been written on actually how to transition to a low-carbon economy. To study this transition, a full “lifecycle analysis” should be performed […]

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For debate: Should shale gas be extracted in the UK?

By Clare Today’s Colbun-related discussions about energy mix decisions, building on the property of many private citizens, and the different perspectives on what is “environmentally friendly”, reminded me of the debate in the UK about shale gas. The estimate for the amount of shale gas found in Britain doubled during this summer to 1329 trillion […]

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Response: Fracking the Monterey Shale

By Anonymous (This is a response to “Fracking the Monterey Shale,” entered here as a new post to preserve the graphics – John M) In the referenced post, a novel solution is proposed to a difficult problem. The idea seems to flow nicely from Professor Reinhardt’s conclusions at the end of the Water class, wherein […]

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Fracking the Monterey Shale – Threat or Opportunity?

By Steve Renter California has had a love-hate relationship with oil for more than 150 years. Shortly after the gold rush, the state’s first productive oil well was drilled in 1865 in the Central Valley just east of San Francisco. Today, California continues to be the third-most oil producing state, behind Texas and Alaska. The […]

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